Edward Murrow and the Radio

Edward Murrow began broadcasting in the 1940s during the outbreak of World War 2.[1]  His fame was accomplished by his ability to bring the war directly into countless American homes.  At this time radio was in nearly every American home, thus making it the mode of communication.  As many Americans sent loved one off to this dreaded war they held comfort that Murrow and his fellow war correspondents would tell them exactly what their loved ones faced.[2]  With an introduction of, “This…is London,” Murrow began his bright future that would eventually lead to a news correspondent job with CBS.[3]

Murrow’s bright career began in 1935 as a manager at CBS.  When the war broke out Murrow determined to make CBS’ “voice of authority” should be one of credited authority Murrow built a team from his fellow news staff.[4]  Murrow chose these individuals not on the radio experience but on their experience with European battlefields.  These fellow correspondents would be known as Murrow’s Boys.[5]  Murrow’s broadcasts found him on the roof tops of London buildings during the 1940’s German Blitz and flying in over twenty bombing missions over Berlin.  Bill Shadel, a Murrow Boy, was the first Allied correspondent to report on the Nazi death camps.[6]

Radio was the means to gather individuals together.  To gather around a radio was a clear and concise method that many families part took in either during dinner or after dinner, as is evident through Edward Murrow’s ‘I Believe’ radio broadcast.[7]  Radio back then was an avenue of connecting with the world.  An owner of a radio could hear any point of view from any number of multiple individuals from every walk of class, color and creed.[8]  Radio was their outside communication with the world when the war started.[9]



[1] Radio Hall of Fame.  “Edward Murrow.” http://www.radiohof.org/news/edwardmurrow.html (accessed September 26, 2011).

[2] Ibid

[3] PBS.  “Edward Murrow.” http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/edward-r-murrow/this-reporter/513/ (accessed September 17, 2011).

[4] Ibid.

[5] The Radio Hall of Fame.  “Edward Murrow.” http://www.radiohof.org/news/edwardmurrow.html (accessed September 26, 2011).

[6] PBS.  “Edward Murrow.” http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/edward-r-murrow/this-reporter/513/ (accessed September 17, 2011).

[7] Edward Murrow, NPR. “The 1951 Introduction to ‘This I Believe’”. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4566554 . (accessed September 26, 2011)

[8] Ibid

[9] Ibid

 

Works Citied

NPR.  “Edward R. Murrow: Broadcasting History, New Book Recounts the Early Days of Radio, TV Journalism.” http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1872668 (accessed September 19, 2011).

PBS.  “Edward Murrow.” http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/edward-r-murrow/this-reporter/513/ (accessed September 17, 2011).

Murrow, Edward NPR. “The 1951 Introduction to ‘This I Believe’”. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4566554 . (accessed September 26, 2011)

The Radio Hall of Fame.  “Edward Murrow.” http://www.radiohof.org/news/edwardmurrow.html (accessed September 26, 2011).

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