Final Project and Final Blog

For my last project, I worked with Ashley, Joe, and Nicole on a documentary about the evolution of the ds106 class. It was an interesting project on several levels. Personally, I was a member of Groom’s original ds106 class, and so charting the evolution was an interesting experience for me. I got to see how the course had shifted and refined itself, and talk to a number of people including Groom himself about what the course provides students with. I was particularly amused by the discussion of the Summer of Oblivion (something which ultimately did not make it into the documentary). I followed the Summer 2011 ds106 course peripherally via twitter and ds106.us, but had never quite understood entirely what was going on. As such, watching the videos on it and hearing Groom and Martha discuss the plot and evolution of the idea of Oblivion was quite fascinating. Sadly, our video was already quite long without the addition of a summary of the Summer of Oblivion, but personally I enjoyed finally figuring out what had been happening.

I helped film several interviews, and also cut together the video and inserted graphics. There were, of course, technical difficulties (there always are). There were more than we had anticipated, though, which made for an exciting few hours before the project was due. The computer in the dml was not enjoying working with us, and Premiere was repeatedly crashing, so to avoid this I ended up having to cut together much of the video in AfterEffects. AfterEffects is not designed for video editing, though – it is designed for graphics. One major side effect of this is that you cannot hear audio without fully rendering the timeline of video (a long, time consuming task, and one that crashed AE when I tried). So all of the b-roll (the video or images that played over the interview) was added to the video based on what I remembered the video saying, because I had no way of knowing exactly what people were talking about. It was quite an adrenaline rush, if in a terrifying sort of way. Ultimately, given the issues we had with technology, I feel like we managed to create quite a good product! I am quite happy with the overall result.

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